The SEC Just Made The Case For Divesting From Fossil Fuel Companies Much Stronger

The existence of the reports represents the start of slow change at these companies, said Danielle Fugere, president of the nonprofit As You Sow, which tracks shareholder proxy fights. Even if the reports are tailored to bolster companies’ profit outlook, she said they provide information to investors that can ultimately strengthen the case for divestment.

“Even when a company doesn’t necessarily give you the response you want, their response gives you information, and that’s the real goal,” she told HuffPost. “Obviously the oil and gas companies haven’t changed what they do, but from an investor perspective, even getting them to think about how they can transition is good.”

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The gigantic sum Facebook pays for Mark Zuckerberg’s personal security

Whatever the reason for the sizable increase in security costs, some believe the company should be more transparent. "At a minimum, shareholders deserve disclosure about why" costs increase that noticeably, said Rosanna Landis Weaver, an executive compensation expert for the nonprofit As You Sow. "When there’s a marked increase like that, there should be an explanation in the footnotes."

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Report Report: Customer insights, power purchasing, proxy preview and more

Proxy Preview 2018 (As You Sow, the Sustainable Investments Institute and Proxy Impact) features more than 400 shareholder resolutions filed on environmental, social and governance issues. The top three shareholder issues are political activity spending (80 resolutions), climate risk (80 resolutions) and equal treatment for women (70 resolutions). The 125 corporate signatories to the RE100 campaign need to add 87 gigawatts of new wind and solar power capacity worldwide by 2030 to meet their 100 percent renewable energy commitments, according to Bloomberg New Energy Finance research. The report suggests that not all of the RE100 members will meet their commitment.

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SEC Gives Exxon a Pass on Shareholder Climate Proposal, But Not Chevron

According to Fugere, Exxon is unlikely to continue to escape shareholder pressure.

“I’m sure shareholders will continue to ask the company to address this issue of how it’s preparing for a low-carbon economy,” she said. “Right now, Exxon’s [Energy and Carbon Summary] report argues there will still be sufficient demand, and the company will continue to provide oil so long as there’s sufficient demand.”

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Starbucks Generates An Astronomical Amount Of Waste–Can It Stop?

“I’m not sure you need to look at developing dramatic materials,” says Conrad Mackerron, senior vice president of As You Sow. “We’ve got to figure out how to really fix the recycling system or really fix the composting system from that side. That’s much higher levels of investment. They need to go to their peers to get them to all give $10 or $20 billion. That would move it.”

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Environment, corporate political spending top proxy season list

The environment and corporate political spending remain key issue areas for shareholder proposals this proxy season, although a number of proposals have also been filed on the opioid crisis, the gender pay gap, and workplace and corporate board diversity, said a report Thursday from non-profit shareholder advocacy groups As You Sow, Sustainable Investments Institute and Proxy Impact.

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Fund managers ‘asleep at the wheel’ over exorbitant executive pay

Rosanna Landis Weaver, programme manager of the CEO pay initiative at As You Sow, said there is growing “awareness of the hazards of outlandish CEO pay packages”. She added: “Unfortunately, awareness has not translated into votes. The rubber-stamping trend continues, even with evidence showing persistent underperformance of the highest paid CEOs.” Andrew Behar, chief executive of As You Sow, added that it was time for the biggest fund managers to realise “how they’re abandoning their fiduciary duty by continuing to approve absurd pay packages”.

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Here are the most overpaid CEOs in America right now

Shareholder advocacy group As You Sow’s annual report of the 100 Most Overpaid CEOs has just been released and, as usual, the salaries of the top CEOs are staggering. Topping this year’s list are Oracle’s co-CEOs Safra A. Catz and Mark Hurd who made a whopping $82,065,708. While that’s not the highest price tag, As You Sow determined they were the most over-compensated CEOs through a complex methodology that you can read here, if you’re into that sort of thing.

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